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Posts for category: Child Care

By Pediatrics of Central Florida, PA
July 02, 2019
Category: Child Care
Tags: Child Care   Physical Exam  

Once your child is born it’s amazing just how quickly they grow and develop. It seems like you blink and suddenly they are talking and walking. During these important milestones it’s also important to have a pediatrician that you turn to regularly to make sure that these developmental milestones are being met and that your child is healthy. After all, if there are any problems you want to find out as soon as possible when early medical interventions can make all the difference.

From the moment your child is born until 2 years old, your pediatrician will most likely want to see them every six months for wellness check ups. After your child turns 2 years old you should still bring them in once a year for a routine physical exam and preventive care. Along with checking your child’s vital signs and monitoring their height and weight your pediatrician will also check hearing, eyesight, respiration, cardiac activity and reflexes.

A physical exam will check all systems of your child’s body to make sure that everything is functioning properly. If your child’s doctor does detect a problem it can be treated immediately. Along with a physical exam your child will also undergo any additional screenings and vaccinations that are necessary for maintaining optimal health.

Furthermore, your pediatrician can also recommend workout routines and appropriate physical activity for your child based on their current health and lifestyle, as well as recommendations on diet, sleeping habits and even their emotional and behavioral health. Even if a pediatrician won’t be able to fully treat all conditions they can still refer your child to a specialist who will be able to handle a specific health problem or injury.

Once a child is old enough to go to school it’s also important that parents schedule their child’s sports physical so that they can participate in physical activity and school sports. An annual sports physical can detect past injuries and other problems that could affect your child’s ability to participate in certain activities.

These physical exams are often mandatory before a child can play school sports; however, even if it isn’t mandatory you should still bring your child in once a year for a comprehensive sports physical to make sure that they are healthy enough for certain physical activity.

Make sure your child is seeing their pediatrician regularly for care, not just when they are sick but also to ward away infections and other health problems. Schedule your child’s next physical exam today.

By Pediatrics of Central Florida, PA
June 04, 2019
Category: Child Care
Tags: Sports Injuries  

Your child's sports injury can be treated just as your injury was. Or, can it? Your pediatrician knows that a child's body is still developing, responding differently to acute and overuse injuries from organized sports, gym class, and more. As such, he or she can help your child avoid injury and in the event of sprain, strain, laceration, dislocation, or head injury, will help your youngster recover and stay healthy.

Kids sports injuries

They're very common, says the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. Annually, 3.5 million American children under the age of 14 suffer significant sports injuries. Some injuries are related to poor conditioning. Others occur because of inadequate instruction or proper protective gear such as padding, eye wear, sneakers, dance shoes, skates, and cleats.

In addition, diligent supervision on the part of parents, coaches, teachers, and other well-informed adults is critical to safe play. Well-maintained game fields and indoor surfaces avoid foot, ankle, and knee injuries.

Finally, KidsHealth reports that Pre-participation Physicals review medical histories and spot possible weaknesses in children's physiology and anatomy. Most school and organized sports teams require these check-ups either with the school physician or the family pediatrician before the sports season commences.

Treating sports injuries

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) states that proper assessment and prompt treatment of kids' sports injuries prevent long-term problems, including pain and proper growth of areas of the body such as the long bones. Traditionally, coaches and parents have used the RICE protocol to stabilize and injury, relieve pain, and begin the healing process. It still works exceptionally well. RICE stands for:

  • Rest
  • Ice to the affected area
  • Compression with an elastic bandage
  • Elevation of the affected limb/injured area above heart level

Then, your pediatrician and other health care providers can devise a specific treatment plan to include physical therapy, strengthening exercises, over the counter analgesics, braces, and casts as needed. As a parent, you know your child well. So be sure to fully participate in your youngster's care plan.

Be safe, be well

Each child responds differently to athletic training depending on his or her gender, size, age, physical conditioning, underlying health issue,s and natural ability. You and your pediatrician can partner together in encouraging a safe sports season for your child. That's a win-win situation.

By Pediatrics of Central Florida
May 24, 2019
Category: Child Care
Tags: asthma  

Is your child wheezing, coughing at night, or extremely fatigued after exercising? If so, they may have childhood asthma, a chronic respiratory condition which constricts the smooth muscle of the airway down into the lungs. Luckily, the eight pediatricians here at Pediatrics of Central Florida in Kissimmee, FL, diagnose and treat asthma so that your child can feel as good as possible!

How does asthma happen?

Asthma has been studied extensively because it affects so many people and causes substantial downtime, emergency room visits, and, Asthmayes, even death. Unfortunately, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology says that 8.3 percent of children in the United States suffer from asthma, and each one needs management.

The wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and mucous production typical of asthma may come on suddenly or gradually. Your pediatricians in Kissimmee, FL, cite many asthma triggers and ask both patients and parents to be aware of them and avoid them whenever possible. Triggers include:

  • Air pollution
  • Tobacco smoke
  • Perfumes, laundry additives, and air fresheners
  • Pet dander
  • Pollen
  • Mold
  • Dust mites
  • Cold weather
  • Exercise
  • Stress
  • Laughing
  • Crying
  • Colds and flu

Patients work toward better control of their symptoms if they keep a journal of their triggers.

Treating asthma

Asthma can indeed be managed. Your pediatrician diagnoses it by symptoms, chest auscultation, and spirometry (your child will breathe into a special apparatus which measures their output). Additionally, the doctor may order lab work, chest X-rays, and allergy testing.

Following diagnosis, the doctor will help you formulate an asthma action plan to include medications as needed and instructions on what to do if a severe attack occurs. Additionally, be sure to call Pediatrics of Central Florida for a sick visit appointment if your child experiences an asthma attack of any severity more than twice a week.

Finally, be sure that those who spend a fair amount of time with your child understand how to deal with their asthma. This would include their caregivers, teachers, coaches, and school nurse.

Breathing easier

Both you and your child will feel better when asthma is well-controlled, and the professional team here at Pediatrics of Central Florida are always here to help! If you have questions about asthma, please contact one of our four offices. We have two in Kissimmee, one in St. Cloud and one in Orlando. You may access help from a staff member 24/7 at (407) 848-3455.

By Pediatrics of Central Florida
May 16, 2019
Category: Child Care
Tags: Mental Health  

It’s easy for parents to be able to pinpoint when there is something physically wrong with their child. They may have a fever, body aches, or abdominal pain. When these symptoms arise parents often know to seek care from their pediatrician. Mental health issues, on the other hand, are just as important to treat as physical complaints; however, these symptoms and problems aren’t always as clear-cut.

Good mental health allows children to feel confident, think properly and develop the proper skills needed for social, personal, and even professional success throughout their lifetime. A child’s environment can greatly impact their emotional and mental states, and it’s important that parents are in tuned with their children, their emotions and what’s going on for them to spot problems right away so that they can seek proper care.

Here are some ways to foster healthy mental well-being in your child:

  • Provide your child with unconditional love
  • Foster a safe, nurturing environment
  • Help build their self-esteem and confidence
  • Encourage their passions and dreams
  • Provide guidance and discipline when necessary

Along with these simple tips it’s also important to ensure that your child is:

  • Getting regular exercise
  • Eating a healthy, balanced diet
  • Getting adequate sleep

Modeling Good Mental Health

Your child mirrors everything you do so by giving them a positive role model your child can mirror good behaviors that foster good mental health. When you take care of yourself your child also learns the importance in self-care. When you find joy in your life your child will also make a priority out of finding things that bring them joy.

Talk to a Pediatrician

We know that it isn’t always easy to determine what behaviors are normal and which ones warrant a deeper look. This is where your children’s doctor can provide you with the information you need. A pediatrician can answer questions about everything from healthy social and emotional skills to behaviors that could be problematic.

It’s also important that parents do not ignore their own mental well-being. After all, mentally healthy parents also provide better care and a positive, happy environment for their children to thrive. If you are having trouble with your own mental well-being it’s okay to talk to your child’s pediatrician about your issues.

If you have questions about your child’s mental health and wellness don’t hesitate to sit down and discuss your questions or concerns with a pediatrician who will be able to guide you along the way to make sure that you are providing your child with everything they need for optimal mental and emotional well-being.

By Pediatrics of Central Florida
March 20, 2019
Category: Child Care
The harder your children play, the harder they might fall. During childhood, fractures and broken bones are common for children playing or participating in sports. While falls are a common part of childhood,
Detecting a Broken Bone your pediatrician in shares important information to help you understand if your child has a broken bone. 
 
If your child breaks a bone, the classic signs might include swelling and deformity. However, if a break isn’t displaced, it may be harder to tell if the bone is broken or fractured. Some telltale signs that a bone is broken are:
  • You or your child hears a snap or grinding noise as the injury occurs
  • Your child experiences swelling, bruising or tenderness to the injured area
  • It is painful for your child to move it, touch it or press on it
  • The injured part looks deformed

What Happens Next?

If you suspect that your child has a broken bone, it is important that you seek medical care immediately. All breaks, whether mild or severe, require medical assistance. Keep in mind these quick first aid tips:
  • Call 911 - If your child has an 'open break' where the bone has punctured the skin, if they are unresponsive, if there is bleeding or if there have been any injuries to the spine, neck or head, call 911. Remember, better safe than sorry! If you do call 911, do not let the child eat or drink anything, as surgery may be required.
  • Stop the Bleeding - Use a sterile bandage or cloth and compression to stop or slow any bleeding.
  • Apply Ice - Particularly if the broken bone has remained under the skin, treat the swelling and pain with ice wrapped in a towel. As usual, remember to never place ice directly on the skin.
  • Don't Move the Bone - It may be tempting to try to set the bone yourself to put your child out of pain, particularly if the bone has broken through the skin, do not do this! You risk injuring your child further. Leave the bone in the position it is in.
Contact your pediatrician to learn more about broken bones, and how you can better understand the signs and symptoms so your child can receive the care they need right away.